Wonderful Bali

Kintamani Tour

Monkey Forest

The Ubud Monkey Forest is home to over 700 grey long-tailed macaques. Also known as the Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal, this natural sanctuary has paved pathways through a leafy nutmeg forest as well as several ancient temples under dense foliage. It’s a popular wildlife reserve in Bali thanks to its community-based management, location and ease of access.

The Ubud Monkey Forest is known for its conservation efforts. Research and studies are regularly carried out for observing the monkeys’ health, diet and breeding habits. You can see these playful primates in their natural habitat, swinging through canopies, and feeding on bananas.

The forest also has several ancient temples with guardian statues covered in moss. Popular sites include the 14th-century PuraDalemAgungPadangtegal and PuraPrajapati, which is dedicated to village funerals. Relics and statues are under dense foliage with little sunlight, resulting in a mysterious and ancient vibe.

Ubud Art Market

Stand at the junction of Jalan Raya Ubud and Jalan Monkey Forest and you’ll find yourself at the very heart of Ubud – literally yards away from the royal palace, the town temple, and the Ubud Art Market, one of the most popular traditional markets in Bali.

The princes of Ubud were – and are – great patrons of art, and the market was an extension of the local nobility’s sponsorship of artists. For over a hundred years now, craftsmen from nearby villages have been bringing their wares to Ubud market to sell. As the tourist tide in Bali grew, word got around that Ubud market offered a better deal than most: the close access to craftsmen’s villages meant that tourists were getting real master’s handiwork at lower prices.

Batuan Temple

Batuan Temple is one of the most popular and beautiful village temple which is part of three major temples in a village that is called Tri Kahyangan, and designed with Balinese architecture with split gates, stone guardians, thatched shrines, and detailed carvings.

The temple features a grand complex of shrines laid out within its 0.65Ha complex. Well preserved sandstone bas motifs and well-preserved traditional Balinese temple architecture are its main draws.

The entry gate to the temple appears as a split gate as if it was formed once as one gate that was split into two parts. This gate leads into a courtyard which has a garden and a galaxy of statues fixed at various locations.

Batuan Temple is mentioned in historical records as far back as 1000 years. The Hindu and Indian influence in the region in the village is evident from the carvings and temples.

Kintamani

Kintamani is one of the most scenic and interesting areas of Bali. A massive volcano erupted 30,000 years ago and created 3 kilometer wide caldera. Now Lake Batur fills half of the ancient caldera and the active Volcano Mount Batur occupies the other half

We will have Lunch in one of the Restaurant in Kintamani with the beautiful panorama of the mountain and the lake.

Tegalallang Rice Terrace

The Tegallalang Rice Terraces in Ubud are famous for their beautiful scenes of rice paddies and their innovative irrigation system. Known as the subak, the traditional Balinese cooperative irrigation system is said to have been passed down by a revered holy man named RsiMarkandeya in the 8th century. Tegallalang forms the 3 most splendid terraced landscapes in Ubud’s shared region, with the others being in the villages of Pejeng and Campuhan.

The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the far side of the valley. The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it’s a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

With the dramatic views within easy reach, the Tegallalang rice terraces offer a fantastic Bali photo opportunity. The vista sprawls down and away to the rice terraces on the slopes across the valley. It’s a very popular view, but this ancient valley has a timeless quality whether there are tourists there or not.

Besakih Tour

Kertagosa

KertaGosa is a beautiful historical site situated in the hearth of Semarapura Town, about 40 km east side of Denpasar City. The name of KertaGosa is taken from Sanskrit where Kerta means serene and meanwhile Gosa word is derive from Gosita that mean established or announced. Thus the meaning of KertaGosa is a kind of Bale building where the king announces Judicial Legislation, justice, punishment and so on.

KertaGosa is founded in 18 century and it has a lot of changed in 20 century. These building have been renovated after earthquake that brought much destroy in year 1971. The most unique of this building is the ceiling made from the asbestos material fully decorated by the traditional painting with Kamasan style famous in 1930. Thirty years later in 1960, Pan Semaris Putra from Pan Seken has restored and renewed according to the original style.

Besakih Temple

Besakih Temple is a temple complex in the village of Besakih on the slopes of Mount Agung in eastern Bali, Indonesia. It is the most important, the largest and holiest temple of Hindu religion in Bali and one of a series of Balinese temples. Perched nearly 1000 meters up the side of GunungAgung, it is an extensive complex of 23 separate but related temples with the largest and most important being PuraPenataranAgung. The temple is built on six levels, terraced up the slope. The entrance is marked by a candibentar (split gateway), and beyond it the Kori Agung is the gateway to the second courtyard.

Kehen Temple

Nestled on a lush hillside about 2 km north of the town center, PuraKehen is considered to be one of Bali’s more impressive temples – many locals refer to it as a miniature version of PuraBesakih, the ‘Mother Temple’ of Bali, and similarly, it also houses eight stepped terraces. Built in the 11th century, the name ‘Kehen’ was derived from the ancient word keren, which translates into ‘flame’. There are 43 altars on the various levels of PuraKehen, with the most distinguished shaded by a tower that has 11 thatched roofs, dedicated to Sang HyangApi, the God of Fire; while at one of the temple corners sits a massive three-compartment stone throne, carved with intricate reliefs. On the temple premises stands a lofty banyan tree that is more than 700 years old, which adds to the attraction. PuraKehen is regarded as the most sacred temple in the region and also serves as the state temple of Bangli.

Bedugul Tour

Taman Ayu

Taman Ayun literally translates as ‘beautiful garden’ and is generally regarded as one of the most attractive temples of Bali. The Taman Ayun temple is situated in a beautiful park with trees and ponds, near the village of Mengwi in the south of Bali at about 8 km southwest of Ubud and 18 km northwest of Denpasar.

Pura Taman Ayun was built in 1634 by the King of Mengwi, I Gusti Agung Putu. It is a socalled PuraKawiten or family temple, a special temple where the deified ancestors of the Raja Dynasty of Mengwi and important gods of other temples are honored.

Ulun Danu Beratan

Ulun Danu Temple is a temple dedicated to the goddess of the lake is Ida Batari Dewi Ulun Danu on the edge of a huge crater. The dominant shrines are Meru’s (pagodas) dedicated to the lake goddess and the gods of Mount Batur and Mount GunungAgung, the largest volcano in Bali. The temple was built in the 17th century in worship of the main Hindu trinity, Brahma-Vishnu-Shiva, as well as the lake goddess, Dewi Danu. The sight and cool atmosphere of the Bali uplands have made the lake and this temple a favourite sightseeing and recreational spot as well as a frequently photographed site.

Ulun Danu Beratan Temple, literally ‘the source temple of Lake Beratan’, is easily the island’s most iconic sanctuary sharing the scenic qualities with the seaside temples of Uluwatu Temple and Tanah Lot Temple. The smooth reflective surface of the lake surrounding most of the temple’s base creates a unique floating impression, while the mountain range of the Bedugul region encircling the lake provides the temple with a scenic backdrop.

Jatih Luwih Rice Terrace

The Jatiluwih rice terraces in the namesake upland village in West Bali are most famous for their dramatic and exotic landscapes. The cool highlands and the breathtaking scenery of this village at the foot of Mount Batukaru makes for wonderful photo opportunities, and serves as a soothing retreat away from the island’s crowded south.

Once a UNESCO Cultural Heritage Site candidate, the Jatiluwih rice terraces comprise over 600 hectares of rice fields that follow the flowing topography of the Batukaru mountain range. These are maintained by a traditional water management cooperative known as subak, which dates back to the 9th century. The cooperative itself eventually won recognition as a dominant factor in Bali’s ‘cultural landscape’ entry on the heritage list.

Tanah Lot Temple

Tanah Lot Temple is probably the most popular and photographed temple on the island which located in coastal side of Beraban countryside, Kediri sub district and Tabanan Regency.

The word of Tanah Lot is consisted of two words that are Tanah word interpreted as a reef looking like gili or isle. Lot or Lod word has meaning the sea. So Tanah Lot is meaning the small island floating on the sea. The location is now called as Tanah Lot has been used at a Megalithic period as a place that looked into holy, proven from the existence of menhir.

Pursuant to environmental condition, hence the structure of Tanah Lot Temple is built at irregular reef plain of its angle which is only consisted of one plain yard as Jeroan. Inside the actual temple compound itself there are tiered shrines that follow the fundamental elements of Balinese design where the number of levels constructed are symbolic to the complexities of the faith. There are other formations within the area that indicate that the site is not only of great religious importance, but also maintains archaeological value. Temple nestled in the ocean has a ritual or ceremony which takes place every 6 months or 210 days. At that time all the Hindus from different areas in Bali will come to worship in peace and harmony.

East Bali Tour

Goa Lawah Temple

Pura Goa Lawah was established in the 11th century by MpuKuturan. MpuKuturan was one of the early priests who introduced Hinduism on Bali. The temple complex may start as the center of meditation for priests.

When the Dutch attacked the Klungkung kingdom of 1849 in the War of Kusamba, the temple was one of the key points during the war. The conflict in the War of Kusamba was between the Royal Netherlands East Indies Army led by Andreas Victor Michiels and the Klungkung kingdom led by Dewa AgungIstriKanya

Tenganan Village

Tenganan, northwest of Candidasa, is situated about 5km from the main road. Tenganan is a symmetrically laid out Bali Aga village with a walled homes and unique crafts. Bali Aga was the original inhabitant of Bali, before the arrival of Hindu Javanese. Tenganan retains its ancient pre-Hindu customs through a strong code of non-fraternization with outsiders, further enforced by the protection of its surrounding walls.

Tenganan is charming and has some very fascinating authentic traditional festival (ritual dances and gladiator) like Bali Aga of Tenganan often holds the battle between local youths. The people of Tenganan are skilled in the unique technique of weaving, called the ‘double ikat’, where the belief in the magical power of the fabric is essential in bringing out the beauty of the ikat cloth.

Tirta Gangga

The TirtaGangga royal water garden is a cool retreat in the eastern highlands of the Karangasem regency in East Bali. It lies on the south-eastern slope of the island’s highest mountain, Mount Agung, and was built in 1946 during the reign of the late king of Karangasem, AnakAgungAnglurah Ketut Karangasem (1887-1966).

Owned and maintained by the royal Karangasem family, the lavish water gardens feature 1.2 hectares of pools, ponds and fountains surrounded by neatly cut lawns that are adorned with stepping stones, ornate statues and tropical gardens. It saw a series of restorations following the destructive hot showers of volcanic ash from the Mount Agung eruption in 1963.

Ubud Tour

Barong Dance

The Barong Dance is among the many art forms closely associated with spirituality, it is often performed in ritual ceremonies. Portraying the classic battle of “Good vs. Evil”, the dance is one of the most well-known and loved on the island.

In Balinese mythology, Barong is a prominent character taken the form of a lion, regarded as the King of the Spirits who represents Virtue. Barong is seen as ‘a guardian angel’. Opposing Good is represented by another mythical creature called Rangda (‘widow’ in Javanese), the Queen of Demons. Rangda leads an army of evil witches against the leader of the forces of Good. As a mirror of life, the Barong Dance portrays the two characters involved in a never ending battle.

Tegenungan Waterfall

Tegenungan Waterfall is located at the TegenunganKemenuh village, in Gianyar, close to the artist village of Ubud. The waterfall is isolated but has become a popular tourist attraction. It is one of the few waterfalls in Bali that is not situated in highlands or mountainous territory. The amount and clarity of the water at the site depends on rainfall but it contains green surroundings with fresh water that can be swum in. The waterfall includes varying highs that can be climbed after the descent down stairs to reach it. This attraction also features a viewing point to the jungle and waterfall at the main entrance.

Monkey Forest

The Ubud Monkey Forest is home to over 700 grey long-tailed macaques. Also known as the Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal, this natural sanctuary has paved pathways through a leafy nutmeg forest as well as several ancient temples under dense foliage. It’s a popular wildlife reserve in Bali thanks to its community-based management, location and ease of access.

The Ubud Monkey Forest is known for its conservation efforts. Research and studies are regularly carried out for observing the monkeys’ health, diet and breeding habits. You can see these playful primates in their natural habitat, swinging through canopies, and feeding on bananas.

The forest also has several ancient temples with guardian statues covered in moss. Popular sites include the 14th-century PuraDalemAgungPadangtegal and PuraPrajapati, which is dedicated to village funerals. Relics and statues are under dense foliage with little sunlight, resulting in a mysterious and ancient vibe.

Ubud Art Market

Stand at the junction of Jalan Raya Ubud and Jalan Monkey Forest and you’ll find yourself at the very heart of Ubud – literally yards away from the royal palace, the town temple, and the Ubud Art Market, one of the most popular traditional markets in Bali.

The princes of Ubud were – and are – great patrons of art, and the market was an extension of the local nobility’s sponsorship of artists. For over a hundred years now, craftsmen from nearby villages have been bringing their wares to Ubud market to sell. As the tourist tide in Bali grew, word got around that Ubud market offered a better deal than most: the close access to craftsmen’s villages meant that tourists were getting real master’s handiwork at lower prices.

Tegalallang Rice Terrace

The Tegallalang Rice Terraces in Ubud are famous for their beautiful scenes of rice paddies and their innovative irrigation system. Known as the subak, the traditional Balinese cooperative irrigation system is said to have been passed down by a revered holy man named RsiMarkandeya in the 8th century. Tegallalang forms the 3 most splendid terraced landscapes in Ubud’s shared region, with the others being in the villages of Pejeng and Campuhan.

The Tegallalang rice terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the far side of the valley. The high roadside location is cool and breezy and it’s a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

With the dramatic views within easy reach, the Tegallalang rice terraces offer a fantastic Bali photo opportunity. The vista sprawls down and away to the rice terraces on the slopes across the valley. It’s a very popular view, but this ancient valley has a timeless quality whether there are tourists there or not.

Price

USD 69 / person (min 2 person)

Inclusions

Comfortable Air-conditioned Minivan + Driver
English Speaking Guide
Entrance Fee & Parking fee at all destinations
Lunch at Local Restaurant
Mineral Water + Snack

Pick Up Area

Denpasar / Kuta / Seminyak / Kerobokan / Jimbaran / Nusa Dua / Uluwatu/ Canggu
Please contact us for other pick up area

Conditions

You will be picked up at your hotel lobby
The tour is a private tour. Feel free to consult with your guide for better tour experience
Please contact us if you need other foreign speaking guide. We will try our best to find one
Tour duration around 10hours

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